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, a little less groomed than usual, but as you can see, looking like himself. on the left this is ghazi balkiz and john klooister, a long-time nbc news photographer. these three men were able to appear live on the "today" show, fife days after being kidnapped and held in captivity in syria. just hours before this shot of them this morning, they were freed by a syrian rebel group who rescued them from an unknown group that had taken them and that had held them for five, long, horrible days. the rebel group not only rescued these three, they then took responsibility for driving them to the border and getting them safely out of syria. they were in syria in the first place to cover the war there. this is footage of richard's last piece for nbc news before the kidnapping happened. richard and his team are veterans in this field. they've been working together for a decade in just about every corner of the world you can imagine, including long stints covering the war in iraq. also the war in afghanistan. when they filed this report last week from aleppo in syria, they reported that conditions
. and now the three of them, richard engel, producer ghazghazi l ghazi balkis and veteran cameraman john koistra appeared on" today" even then did we learn how they had been treated. >> we were driving in syria, about five days ago, in what we thought was a rebel-controlled area. we were with some of the rebels. as we were moving down the road a group of gunmen literally jumped out of trees and bushes on the side of the road. probably 15 gunmen, wearing ski masks, heavily armed. they dragged us out of the car. they had a container truck positioned waiting by the side of the road. they put us into that container truck. we were with some gunmen, some rebels who were escorting us. they executed one of them on the spot. then they took us to a series of safe houses and interrogation places. and they kept us blindfolded, bound. we weren't physically beaten or tortured. it was a lot of psychological torture. threats of being killed. they made us choose which one of us would be shot first. and when we refused there were mock shootings. it can be very traumatic experience. and at the end of this,
find that happy spot. we kept each other, as ghazi said. >> we passed messages to each other. we joked around. we weren't allowed to speak. but if you sort of look kind of peek underneath the blindfold, you can see if maybe there is a guard in the room or not. and we tried to joke back and forth and keep our spirits up. >> nbc news chief foreign correspondent richard engel and his crew. >> ghazi balkiz and john kooistra. they were freed after five days after being held by an unknown group inside war-torn syria. what richard said about there being other people held who are not freed. he is right. austin tice is an american reporter who has worked for a number of outlets, including mcclatchy service and the "washington post." he has been missing in syria since august. in all there are 15 journalists who have reported to have gone missing in syria while reporting on this conflict. so far of the 15 only eight have been freed. our richard and ghazi and john are three of them. we and they and their families feel very lucky and very happy tonight that that is the case, even as we continue to
of men ghazi. we have an expeditionary diplomatic corps, and they do face very real risks every day, day in and day out. bad things have happened before, and bad things will happen again, unfortunately, in the future. there will always be a tension between the diplomatic imperative to get outside the wire and the security standards that require our diplomats to work behind high walls and full-body searches. we do not want to conner is tee that wire america off from the world. our challenge is to strike a balance between the necessity of the mission, available resources and toll wraps for risk -- tolerance for risk. we've talked about this on this committee. we've had hearingsings specifically about the design of our embassies, the danger of becoming a fortress america. we need to be safe, but we also need to send the right message to the people that we're trying to reach. i distinctly remember feeling and seeing the difficulty of this in vietnam where villages would examine us suspiciously and give us a stare, an unmistakeable stare that raises many more questions than we're ever able to
. with regards to being killed, they made us choose which one would be shot first. they pretended to shoot ghazi several times. then they fired a gun up in the air. it can be a very traumatic experience. >> a harrowing ordeal for our colleagues. we're all very grateful that they ended up escaping unharmed. >>> next, virginia governor bob mcdonald who is all too familiar with the pain of a mass shoot, how his state changed gun laws and whether those laws have any teeth to it. plus, the growing number of voices in his state calling for tighter gun control. but first, look ahead at the president's schedule. it's another quiet day on the schedule and one that is mostly cleared, it appears, to deal with fiscal cliff negotiations. you're watching the daily rundown only on msnbc. you can prevent gas with beano meltaways, or treat gas with these after you get it. now that's like sunblock before or sun burn cream later. oh, somebody out there's saying, now i get it! take beano before and there'll be no gas. that's a good thing, but it doesn't cover everything. only about 80% of your part b medical expens
and foreign policy. a tragedy occurred in benghazi. ghazi is inherently unstable. would that be a fair statement, ambassador burns? you might guess commissary. then ghazi in that. and to this day still in a very unstable place. >> have you read the report chaired by ambassador pickering and admiral mullen? >> i certainly have. >> tobacco include the susan rice for secretary clinton or charlene lamb were responsible, was that the conclusion of this report? >> the report concluded it was terrorists responsible for the deaths of our four colleagues. >> at the report concluded deliberate or less than deliberate effort to cover that fact at any time at the time of the events are subsequently? >> no commissary. >> is it fair perhaps to conclude that in retrospect, mistakes are made within the state department about the allocation of resources and the nature and extent of security that needed to be provided to benghazi? >> is certainly is. it is quite clear and candid in identifying problems that occurred. those problems are unacceptable. we take responsibility for them and we are working ver
is because the come the case of the ghazi demonstrates. the biggest policy questions, which i hope we debate is how we become more nimble and understand political trends of the society. thanks. [applause] >> thank you very much, brian. dan, you're a. >> first of all, i'm very honored to be here. and particularly honored to be on the panel of just the greatest admiration to be with this mostly distinguished panel. [laughter] with the exception of course is reuel. and now, the austrian physicist, wolfgang pauli used to put down his worst students by saying, you're not even wrong. [laughter] and that's how i'm inclined to take particularly reuel's comments. i'll spare you because we don't know each other as well. if i say to my son, what is five plus seven and 611, that is wrong. if he says that nana, he's not even wrong. what you just heard from reuel especially as nanette. this is the argument because woody is just essentially done in a very slippery and disingenuous way to say that the choice we face is between secular dictatorship of mopar escapes or other stripes, perhaps assad is democrac
. they pretended to shoot ghazi several times. when you're blindfolded, and then they fired the gun up in the air. it can be very traumatic experience. and at end of this, we were being moved to yet another location in the -- around 11:00 last night local time. and as we were moving along the road, the kidnappers came across a rebel checkpoint. something they hadn't expected. and so we were in the back of, like, when you think of as a minivan, and as we were driving along the road, the kidnappers saw this checkpoint, started a gunfight with it, two of the kidnappers were killed, we climbed out of the vehicle and the rebels took us. we spent the night with them. we didn't get much sleep. >> well, brooke, you heard it there. essentially they were -- they were rescued by rebels, close to the syrian regime. this is an unbelievably lucky escape. let's be honest here. it could have gone horribly wrong, a million different ways, held captive, kidnapped, in a house, transported to a second location. at that point, running into a rebel checkpoint completely by accident. and getting into a gunfight where t
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)